Marlon James

Thursday, September 25, 2014

The New York Times calls A Brief History of Seven Killings by Marlon James a "monumental new novel"

"It’s like a Tarantino remake of “The Harder They Come” but with a soundtrack by Bob Marley and a script by Oliver Stone and William Faulkner, with maybe a little creative boost from some primo ganja. It’s epic in every sense of that word: sweeping, mythic, over-the-top, colossal and dizzyingly complex. It’s also raw, dense, violent, scalding, darkly comic, exhilarating and exhausting — a testament to Mr. James’s vaulting ambition and prodigious talent." Read the full review here.

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Thursday, September 23, 2010

The Book of Night Women by Marlon James Wins the Dayton Literary Peace Prize

Marlon James won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize in the fiction category for his The Book of Night Women. Inspired by the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords that ended the war in Bosnia, The Dayton Literary Peace Prize is the only international literary peace prize awarded in the United States. The Prize celebrates the power of literature to promote peace and global understanding. More...

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Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Marlon James Wins Minnesota Book Award

Marlon James won the Minnesota Book Award for fiction for The Book of Night Women. The winners were selected from a pool of 250 books nominated and narrowed to 32 finalists. The 22nd annual awards is a project of the Friends of the St. Paul Public Library and the city of St. Paul, along with multiple sponsors.
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Tuesday, December 29, 2009

New York loves Marlon James' The Book of Night Women

New York Magazine names Marlon James' The Book of Night Women the #3 Best Book of 2009. It also landed on Time Out New York's Best of 2009 list, calling it a work of "stunning gravitas and beauty."

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Thursday, December 17, 2009

Riverhead continues sweep of best books of ‘09 lists

Riverhead has made an appearance on many of the Best Books of 2009 lists, from The New York Times to The New Yorker, and the accolades keep rolling in. The Cleveland Plain Dealer picked The Book of Night Women as one of the 20 Best Books of 2009. Largehearted Boy named Cristina Henríquez’s The World in Half a Favorite Novel of 2009. Salon picked Sarah Waters’ The Little Stranger. Love and Obstacles was chosed by the Kansas City Star. The Boston Globe selected Walter Mosley’s The Long Fall. The Christian Science Monitor picked Barbara Bradley Hagerty's Fingerprints of God and David Owen's Green Metropolis. Alan Beattie's False Economy is an 800 CEO Read Best Business Book of 2009.Plus, the San Francisco Chronicle names Bernardine Evaristo’s Blonde Roots and Aleksandar Hemon’s Love and Obstacles as two of the Best Books of 2009.

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Thursday, December 10, 2009

The Morning News' Tournament of Books longlists four Riverhead books

For the first time in six years the Morning News has released their long list for the 2010 Tournament of Books, and Riverhead is well represented with Marlon James’ The Book of Night Women, Nami Mun’s Miles from Nowhere, Sarah Waters’ The Little Stranger, and Juan Gabriel Vásquez’s The Informers. The short list as well as the judges will be announced in January.

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Wednesday, December 02, 2009

Library Journal's Best Books of 2009 include The Man Who Loved Books Too Much and The Book of Night Women

Library Journal announced their picks for the Best Books of 2009 and two Riverhead titles made the cut. Allison Hoover Bartlett’s The Man Who Loved Books Too Much—“A compulsively readable tale”—and Marlon James’ The Book Of Night Women—“Fearlessly written and gaspingly wrenching to read.”

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Friday, September 11, 2009

Riverhead authors at the Brooklyn Book Festival, Sunday Sept. 13

2:00 p.m. Satire and Comic Relief in 2009. Whatever else is down (the economy, the Republicans)—satire is up.  A conversation with authors Jeffery Rotter (The Unknown Knowns), Gary Shteyngart (Absurdistan) and SLOANE CROSLEY (I Was Told There’d Be Cake). Moderated by New Yorker editor Ben Greenman (Superworse).

2:00 p.m. The Naked City: Urban Realism and the Global City in Fiction & Non-Fiction. A discussion exploring the gritty urban realism of the contemporary global city as seen through recent works of fiction and non-fiction about Delhi, New York and Mexico City. Featuring DAVID LIDA (First Stop in the New World), Meera Nair (Video) and Hirsh Sawhney (editor, Delhi Noir). Moderated by Cheryl Harris Sharman (Nightshift NYC).

3:00 p.m. American Food. Three writers discuss the past, present and future of what we eat. Featuring MARK KURLANSKY (The Food of a Younger Land), Jennifer 8. Lee (The Fortune Cookie Chronicles) and Liz Thorpe (The Cheese Chronicles). Moderated by “Serious Eats” blogger Ed Levine.

4:00 p.m. Crime and Punishment. Readings from three of the most dangerous and compelling novels of 2009. Featuring Lou Manfredo (Rizzo’s War), Liz Balmaseda (Sweet Mary) and MARLON JAMES (The Book of Night Women). Introduced by Tim McLoughlin.

See the Brooklyn Book Festival website for more information and the full schedule.

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Monday, July 06, 2009

Marlon James on growing up in Jamaica obsessed with Michael Jackson

Marlon James, author of The Book of Night Women, writes for Granta about growing up with the King of Pop: "Michael Jackson lost his childhood but he extended mine. He could moonwalk as if gravity was just a theory and Peter Pan fact. He could claim to be a virgin and make every nerd instantly cooler. By imitating Jackson I found a way to be me without being made fun of."

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Wednesday, May 13, 2009

The Boston Globe on Marlon James's The Book of Night Women

In this story of slavery, souls refuse to be shackled

"Marlon James's The Book of Night Women is a devastating epic of savage history, relentless oppression, and souls that refuse to be shackled … a searing read, full of blood, tears, and the stench of misery. It's barbaric and ancient, but also familiar in the ways that people, consumed by their differences and divisions, easily overlook all that binds them -- the desire for independence, the right to a civilized life, and the need to give and receive love." More...

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